Previous Years Reports

This page contains previous years Director of Public Health Reports for East Sussex.
 

Jump to 2015/16 report - Strengthening Personal Resilience in East Sussex
Jump to 2014/15 report
 - Growing Community Resilience in East Sussex
Jump to 2013/14 report
 - Delivering Healthy Lives, Healthy People, the East Sussex Health and Wellbeing Strategy
Jump to 2012/13 report
 - Reducing health inequalities among children and young people in East Sussex
Jump to 2012 report
      - Health and Well-being in East Sussex
Jump to 2010/11 report
 - Reducing Health Inequalities in East Sussex
Jump to 2009/10 report
 - The Health and Wellbeing of Older People
Jump to 2008/09 report - The Health and Wellbeing of Children and Young People
Jump to 2007/08 report - Improving Life, Increasing Health

 
 

2015/16 report - Strengthening Personal Resilience in East Sussex


 

Low resolution version

Strengthening Personal Resilience in East Sussex, January 2016 (Adobe PDF, 4.8MB) (opens new window)

High resolution version

Strengthening Personal Resilience in East Sussex, January 2016 (Adobe PDF, 26MB) (opens new window)

 

The 2015/16 Director of Public Health Annual Report, Strengthening Personal Resilience in East Sussex, builds on the 2014/15 Director of Public Health Report,Growing Community Resilience in East Sussex, by focussing on the need to develop and strengthen personal resilience to underpin and support growing community resilience.

Growing Community Resilience in East Sussex, focused on how we can build community resilience by growing the assets of wellbeing across East Sussex. It looked at how we can identify, better understand and support development of existing and potential new community assets. It described how individuals can play a significant role in increasing community resilience and how systematic processes can be used to support this work and monitor its impact particularly in developing sustainability.

Based on a review of the evidence, this report recommended further work to enhance community resilience which seeks positively to develop, harness and mobilise the assets, capacities and resources available to individuals and communities to enable them to gain more control over their lives and circumstances and to meet primary prevention, health, wellbeing and social care support needs.

Resilience is the result of individuals being able to interact with their environments and the processes that either promote well-being or protect them against the overwhelming influence of risk factors. Risk factors such as poverty, low socioeconomic status, parental mental health issues are correlated with poor or negative outcomes. Even when these risk factors occur, resilient individuals avoid the negative outcomes usually associated with those risk factors and develop positive outcomes nonetheless.

As individuals live and work within communities, personal and community resilience are closely linked. For example, communities provide the social networks and opportunities to build self-esteem and purposeful lives which are essential components of personal resilience. Likewise, communities are dependent on the contribution of healthy, resilient individuals.

Strengthening Personal Resilience in East Sussex starts by explaining what personal resilience is and how it can be developed and supported and then goes on tooutline some of the ways in which we are supporting building personal resilience through programmes and services. The report emphasises that individuals need to take advantage of the opportunities these services and programmes afford to help them build their personal resilience.

Each report chapter deals with a different area, and there are chapters on primary prevention, protecting health and person-centred care and support.

The report makes nine recommendations for strengthening personal resilience in East Sussex.


2014/15 report - Growing Community Resilience in East Sussex


 

Growing Community Resilience in East Sussex, December 2014 (Adobe PDF, 13MB) (opens new window)

Supplement: WARM Mapping by GP Practice (Adobe PDF, 25MB) (opens new window)

Supplement: WARM Mapping by Electoral Ward (Adobe PDF, 17MB) (opens new window)

  

This annual report focuses on how we can build resilience by growing the assets of wellbeing across East Sussex. Assets are any factor (or resource), which enhances the ability of individuals, communities, and populations, to maintain and sustain health and wellbeing and to help to reduce health inequities. This includes the skills and capacities of the individuals, the formal and informal networks and associations, the institutions, the land and other physical assets within a community.

It looks at how we can identify, better understand and support development of existing and potential new community assets. It focuses on identifying the key features of asset-based approaches and how we can make further progress in a sustainable manner. It initially focuses on describing what an asset based approach involves and how it is different from focusing on deficits in the current services and support people receive. It describes how individuals can play a significant role in increasing community resilience. The report describes how systematic processes can be used to support this work and monitor its impact particularly in developing sustainability.

Based on a review of the evidence, this report recommends further work to enhance community resilience which seeks positively to develop, harness and mobilise the assets, capacities and resources available to individuals and communities to enable them to gain more control over their lives and circumstances and to meet primary prevention, health, wellbeing and social care support needs.

The second part of this report sets out a relatively new way to measure the wellbeing and resilience of communities. It describes a tool – Wellbeing and Resilience Measure (WARM) – that has been designed to support local agencies and communities to better understand, plan and act. WARM provides a way of understanding and identifying an area’s strengths, such as levels of social capital, confidence amongst residents, the quality of local services or proximity to employment; as well as vulnerabilities such as isolation, high crime, low savings and unemployment. The tool identifies these factors using routinely available information.

WARM has been calculated for East Sussex at ward and district and borough level and also modelled at clinical commissioning group and GP practice level. All the WARM maps at ward and GP practice level are available to download as separate documents above.

The report concludes by summarising the approach outlined in the report and, drawing on the evidence and best practice, looks at the ways in which the skills, knowledge, connections and resource of individuals, communities and organisations might best be captured, harnessed and strengthened. The report makes ten recommendations for supporting community resilience in East Sussex.

 

 

 

2013/14 report - Delivering Healthy Lives, Healthy People, the East Sussex Health and Wellbeing Strategy


 

The 2013/14 Public Health Report has been produced to inform delivery of the Health and Wellbeing Strategy action plan and aims to provide a robust basis for decision making, building on work already undertaken in East Sussex.

Delivering Healthy Lives, Healthy People, the East Sussex Health and Wellbeing Strategy, December 2013 (Adobe PDF, 2.2MB) (opens new window)

The recommendations in this report will help service commissioners to ensure that they make the best investment of the resources they have available and to weigh the return on that investment against other competing priorities.

Content of the report

The report presents the results from a series of rapid evidence and literature reviews aligned to the seven priority areas of the Strategy and supporting action plan. For each of the seven priority areas, sub-topics have been identified which are important for delivery. Recommendations from the evidence reviews have been included in the report, and the full evidence reviews can be found under the Evidence section of this website.

The report provides a check list against which commissioning plans and strategies can be compared to ensure they are based on current best evidence. It is therefore important that commissioners and multi-agency partnerships responsible for delivering the action plan supporting the implementation of the Health and Wellbeing Strategy review all the recommendations and prioritise the key recommendations for implementation. It is suggested that recommendations should be prioritised where they:

·         are not part of current practice;
·         highlight the need for practice to change;
·         require retraining or the development of new skills;
·         require implementation by a broad range of agencies or across a range of settings;
·         may be viewed as potentially contentious or difficult to implement for other reasons.

To make recommendations more easily accessible and to aid review of them for prioritisation, a series of booklets have also been produced. Each booklet focuses on just one of the priority areas in the East Sussex Health and Wellbeing Strategy, and reproduces what is contained in the main report for that area including all the recommendations.  All seven booklets are available to download below. 

 

 

Booklet 1: The best possible start for all babies and young children

Booklet 2: Safe, resilient and secure parenting for all children and young people

Booklet 3: Enabling people of all ages to live healthy lives and have healthy lifestyles

Booklet 4: Preventing and reducing falls, accidents and injuries

Booklet 5: Enabling people to manage and maintain their mental health and wellbeing

Booklet 6: Supporting those with special educational needs, disabilities and long term conditions

Booklet 7: High quality and choice of end of life care

 

 

 

2012/13 report - Reducing health inequalities among children and young people in East Sussex


 

The main focus of this report is reducing health inequalities among children and young people in East Sussex.

Reducing health inequalities among children and young people in East Sussex, January 2013 (Adobe PDF, 1.8MB) (opens new window)

The report outlines the key factors contributing to health inequalities among children and young people in East Sussex; describes the services that are currently in place to improve health and prevent disease; and recommends future priorities for improving the health and wellbeing of the youngest members of our community. It includes the key findings from the health related behaviour survey 2012.  For more details about the findings of the survey please click here to go to the separate County, District and Borough level summaries of the schools survey and the full detailed report.

Chapter 1 provides information about the number of children and young people living in East Sussex and illustrates that almost 1 in 5 (18.8%) are living in poverty. Details are provided about the variation across the county in both the numbers and percentages of children living in poverty.

Chapter 3 describes the antenatal and postnatal period and includes information about infant mortality and what can be done to tackle this including reducing maternal smoking and improving breastfeeding rates.

Chapter 4 focuses on children of pre-school age and includes data about vaccination rates, and details some the services in place to improve the health of vulnerable children and families.

Chapter 5 sets out information about children and young people with additional needs including those who are looked after, those with child protection issues, those with special educational needs and disability and those who are not in education, employment or training.

Chapter 6 is about school age children and young people and includes data about educational achievement and the results of the 2012 schools health-related behaviour survey.  More details on the results of the survey can be found by following this link Survey results

Chapter 7 focuses on healthcare for children and young people and underlies the nationally high rate of emergency admissions due to accidents, as well as apparently high rates of hospital use in certain clinical areas


The report outlines many encouraging signs that efforts to improve health and prevent disease among local babies, children and young people are having an impact. However there are also indications that health inequalities persist in our county, perpetuated by continued deprivation and unhealthy lifestyles. A recurring theme throughout the report is the geographical variation in levels of health and wellbeing and health-promoting behaviour in children and young people. Data presented in the report reinforces the relationship between deprivation, unhealthy lifestyles and poor health.

The recommendations in this report are written to reflect current ownership and it should be noted that the responsibility for implementing some of them may change from April 2013. 
 



 

2012 report - Health and Well-being in East Sussex

The main focus of this report is Health and Well-being in East Sussex and is aimed at those working to improve health and well-being and reduce inequalities in East Sussex.

Health and Well-being in East Sussex, March 2012 (Adobe PDF, 1.2MB) (opens new window)



Chapter 1 sets out the health priorities for East Sussex, Chapter 2 the results from the Health and Lifestyle surveys carried out in 1992, 2003 and 2011. Finally Chapter 3 sets out effective Public Health Interventions and Services. The report contains recommendations for the Health & Well-being Board and commissioners.

Six key health priorities for East Sussex have been identified through the 2011 Health Needs Profiles, produced as part of the local Joint Strategic Needs Assessment Programme. The issues reflect areas where health inequalities are significant, effective health gain is achievable or where East Sussex is out of line with the national picture. These are the priority areas where action should be focused to improve health and reduce health inequalities in our population:
 

  1. life expectancy and the wider determinants of health;
  2. chronic disease, cancer and mental health;
  3. improving and protecting health by encouraging healthy lifestyle;
  4. older people;
  5. accidents and falls;
  6. end of life.

This report builds on our local evidence base particularly around encouraging healthy lifestyles. The 2011 Health and Lifestyle Survey provides new insight into current lifestyle behaviours of East Sussex residents and new, innovative approaches to targeting specific lifestyle and behaviour interventions based on health segmentation of the population to bring about behaviour change.
 


Some of the key findings from this survey are:

  • The percentage of people reporting ‘good’ to ‘excellent’ health in 2011 (78%) is statistically significantly lower than in 1992 (84%).
  • Thirty three percent of East Sussex residents reported having a long-standing illness, disability or health problem, in 2011 compared to 28% in 1992, which is statistically significantly higher.
  • Health status scores have changed little over 20 years.
  • The percentage of people at risk of major depression has not changed over the last 20 years. It remains at 32%.
  • In 1992, 26% of people in East Sussex were smokers and in 2011 this has statistically significantly decreased to 18%. Hastings (25%) and Eastbourne (20%) have the highest percentage of smokers.
  • The percentage of people drinking alcohol has not increased between 1992 and 2011. However, the percentage of those that drink and are classified as ‘increasing risk’ or ‘higher risk’ has increased. So, drinkers are drinking more.
  • Physical activity has increased. Compared to 2003, statistically significantly fewer people in East Sussex in 2011 never exercise/exercise less than one day a month. Both Lewes and Wealden have had a statistically significant increase in the percentage of people who exercise 5 or more days per week.
  • Fruit and vegetable consumption has gone up since 2003, and the consumption of the recommended 5 or more portions of fruit and vegetables per day has statistically significantly increased at an East Sussex level.
  • Compared to 2003 there has been a statistically significant increase in the percentage of people in East Sussex that think they are the right weight. However, 52% of people still think they are overweight.


The health promotion primary prevention and social care prevention evidence review provides a robust evidence base for commissioning clinically and cost effective services.

The report also provides recommendations for actions for commissioners in each public health area:

  • Smoking
  • Diet and weight
  • Alcohol and drugs
  • Accident Prevention
  • Physical Activity
  • Mental Wellbeing


  2010/11 report - Reducing Health Inequalities in East Sussex

The main focus of this report is on inequalities in health for people in East Sussex, the factors that contribute to these differences, and the actions we need to take to reduce these inequalities.

There is a main report which is designed to be an online resource of information: 

Reducing Health Inequalities in East Sussex - Full Version (Adobe PDF, 3.5MB) (opens new window)


A summary of this main report which gives an overview of the key issues discussed and recommendations from the main report: 

Reducing Health Inequalities in East Sussex - Summary Version (Adobe PDF, 1.3MB) (opens new window)


Additionally we have collated summaries for each of the districts and boroughs, which provide an abstract of the data available for each area:
 


Chapter 1 explores what health inequalities actually are. We also discuss what causes them and why tackling them is important. This chapter identifies some of the key data and methods used to quantify health inequalities and presents the current position using those measures. District and borough level information is presented in tables, charts and maps.

A particular focus of Chapter 2 is the identification of the main contributors to the gap in life expectancy between the most and the least deprived areas. At an East Sussex level, circulatory diseases, cancer and respiratory diseases are the top three contributors, but at district and borough level there is some variation. This chapter presents the main causes of the life expectancy gap for each district and borough and what the possible gain in life expectancy in the most deprived areas would be if, for specific diseases, the death rates were the same as the least deprived areas.

Key information from the Joint Strategic Needs Assessment Programme is also included in this chapter. Based on the latest Joint Strategic Needs Assessment Scorecards, profiles for each district and borough have been produced and are included here. Details of comprehensive needs assessments and also the focused work on increasing life expectancy within the twenty wards in the lowest life expectancy across East Sussex (Investing in Life Programme) are also included in this chapter.

Chapter 3 describes some of the work we are currently doing to tackle health inequalities. It explains our local approach to promoting health in the five priority areas: alcohol, smoking and tobacco control, obesity, sexual health, mental health and wellbeing. Circulatory diseases, cancer and respiratory diseases are the top three contributors to the gap in life expectancy and so the work being done to reduce these is described. Also included in this chapter are sections which have a particular focus on children and young people and older people.

The final chapter, Chapter 4, proposes the next steps for further reducing health inequalities in East Sussex. We’ve considered national best practice and key things that are expected to make an impact in a short timescale if delivered at a sufficient scale. A main focus here is on improving the quality of general practices.

The final chapter outlines Marmot’s framework for action and the actions that are expected to make an impact in the medium to long term.
 

Inequality Indicators

The Director of Public Health’s Annual Report for 2010/11 Reducing Health Inequalities in East Sussex used a number of different indicators to assess health inequalities within East Sussex. The attached briefing provides a summary of the advantages and disadvantages of the different indicators in the report to provide clarity on how and when they should be used to measure inequalities at the local level.
 

2009/2010 Report - The Health and Wellbeing of Older People

       

This is the third annual public health report for NHS East Sussex Downs and Weald, NHS Hastings and Rother and East Sussex County Council (ESCC). This report focuses on older people’s health and wellbeing and emphasise the importance of the quality of services provided for them.

Chapter 2 describes the population, such as the proportions of people aged 65 and over living in different areas of East Sussex. It also provides data on the numbers of older people experiencing poverty in East Sussex and how this impacts on their use of services and the inequalities in health. In East Sussex we have the highest proportion of older people of any county in England and we need to ensure that there is a balance between commissioning services where the greatest concentration of older people live and also targeting the areas where older people are likely to be in the greatest need because of social isolation, income deprivation and being aged over 85 years.

Chapter 3 focuses on data concerning life expectancy and mortality of older people. There are technical notes in appendix 1 to help understand how this data is measured and interpreted. There is a variation in life expectancy across East Sussex and work needs to continue to target the Investing in Life Programme in areas of lowest life expectancy.

Chapter 4 describes the pattern of illnesses that older people tend to develop such as stroke, dementia, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and the services provided to treat them. Recommendations are made for the local variations in conditions such as COPD, hospital admissions and falls to be reviewed by Practice Based Commissioning (PBC) clusters to consider alternative service provisions in the community.

Chapter 5 reviews activities for promoting healthy old age and describes work being carried out in East Sussex on areas such as stopping smoking, eating a healthy diet and taking exercise, taking part in screening programmes and having an annual flu jab with the overall benefit of adding years to life and life to years. It’s never too late to improve health by stopping smoking.

Chapter 6 describes the range of quality initiatives that have been taking place and are in development.

Finally, chapter 7 outlines how we work across health and social care in order to improve the health and wellbeing of older people in East Sussex. It is my intention that the findings of this annual public health report will be used by these to inform the future commissioning of services for older people to better meet their needs.




2008/2009 Report - The Health and Wellbeing of Children and Young People

     
The main focus of this report is the health and wellbeing of children and young people in East Sussex and the health issues they face. Infancy, childhood and young adulthood are stages of life when people develop habits which will affect people’s health in later years.


The report begins with an introduction to children’s health and then paints a picture of what life is like for children and young people in our area, including where they live and in what conditions, and how that affects their health.

Chapter three has details of how the needs of children fit into the main areas of work being done to improve the health of the population as a whole: reducing the numbers of people who smoke; tackling obesity; improving sexual health; improving mental health and wellbeing; reducing alcohol harm and encouraging sensible drinking; and helping children and young people to lead healthy lives. This chapter also has examples of services available and the work being carried out to help children and young people lead as healthy lives as possible.

Chapter four gives us a breakdown of how many children and young people in our area are dying and the reasons why and chapter five describes what life is like for some of the most vulnerable children in East Sussex including those living with long-term disease, teenage parents, looked after children and children and young people who are caring for others in their family.

In chapters six and seven we look at what we plan to do to help improve the health of children and young people.


2007/2008 Report - Improving Life, Increasing Health

       

This was the first Director of Public Health Annual Report since the inception of the new Primary Care Trusts in October 2006.
This report identifies the important public health issues facing the people living in East Sussex and makes recommendations on the actions that will be needed in the coming year to improve their health.